Support



Students

Undergraduate Students


Students enrolled in School of Computing & Information Sciences (SCIS) courses are automatically given an account each semester. You can use your account to login to the Windows PCs, Macs, or Linux machines in the John C. Comfort Laboratory (JCCL) undergraduate labs located in ECS 237 and ECS 241. This access is granted for the duration of the semester only.

Your username is your FIU username. Your FIU username is the first part of your email address before the '@fiu.edu' and in the form: jdoe001. If you do not know your FIU username, log into MyFIU, select Main Menu Campus Solutions Self Service Campus Personal Information Email Addresses. You will see your 'Campus' email address in the form: jdoe001@fiu.edu. The characters before '@fiu.edu' is your FIU username.

Your initial password is the first initial of your first name, followed by your Panther ID, and the first initial of your last name. For example: A student named 'John Doe' with a Panther ID of '1234567' would be 'j1234567d'.

Note: If you registered late for a class, your account will be created within the next 24 hours after you have registered. Each semester your JCCL password is reset to the initial password. All accounts will expire on the last day of classes and it is your responsibility to maintain a backup of your computer files.


Graduate Students

Students enrolled in School of Computing & Information Sciences (SCIS) courses are automatically given an account each semester. You can use your account to login to the Windows PCs, Macs, or Linux machines in the graduate lab located in ECS 252.

Your username is your FIU username. Your FIU username is the first part of your email address before the '@fiu.edu' and in the form: jdoe001. If you do not know your FIU username, log into MyFIU, select Main Menu Campus Solutions Self Service Campus Personal Information Email Addresses. You will see your 'Campus' email address in the form: jdoe001@fiu.edu. The characters before '@fiu.edu' is your FIU username.

Your initial password is the first initial of your first name, followed by your Panther ID, and the first initial of your last name. For example: A student named 'John Doe' with a Panther ID of '1234567' would be 'j1234567d'.

Note: If you registered late for a class, your account will be created within the next 24 hours after you have registered. It is your responsibility to maintain a backup of your computer files.


My credentials work on the Linux machines but not the Windows PCs or vice-versa

There are two sets of login credentials. One set is for the Windows PCs and Macs and the other is for the Linux machines. If this is your first time logging in to one of the systems, your username is your FIU username. Your FIU username is the first part of your email address before the '@fiu.edu' and in the form: jdoe001. Your password is the standard initial password which is the initial of your first name, followed by your Panther ID, and the initial of your last name.

For example: A student named 'John Doe' with a Panther ID of '1234567' would be 'j1234567d'.


It takes me a long time to login to the Windows PCs. What can I do to fix this?

The School of Computing & Information Sciences (SCIS) uses roaming profiles. Roaming profiles allow a user's desktop and application settings to follow them no matter which workstation they login to on the domain. This roaming profile is downloaded to the computer when you login and uploaded back to the server when you log off. The reason it takes you a long time to login is because you have a lot of data in your roaming profile.

Your roaming profile lives in a hidden directory in your home directory called ".ad-profile-win7". In Windows, C:\Users\ is your Roaming Profile. The most common culprits for slow logins are Dropbox and virtual machines. When installed incorrectly, these can add numerous gigabytes worth of data to your roaming profile which translates to a substantial login time.

The contents of this folder should not be modified while you are logged in to a Windows PC. You will need to SSH in to one of our Unix servers and move or delete the offending folders and or files from your roaming profile.


How do I change my Windows password?

Once your logged in, press CTRL + ALT + DELETE and select the option that says "Change a password".


How do I change my Linux password?

Once your logged in, open a terminal and type 'yppasswd'.

I already have an email account elsewhere. Why do I need an FIU email account?

All official correspondence from FIU and the School of Computing & Information Sciences (SCIS) will be sent to your FIU email account.


How do I check my FIU email?

Students need to visit PantherMail at http://panthermail.fiu.edu


I have forgotten my password. What should I do?

To change or reset your password, visit the FIU My Accounts Web site at http://myaccounts.fiu.edu

If you need more help, please contact the UTS Support Center online at http://uts.fiu.edu or by calling 305.348.2284.

SSH

Windows: Windows users need to download an SSH client first. Students can obtain a free SSH client called PuTTY from http://www.chiark.greenend.org.uk/~sgtatham/putty. Once you have downloaded and installed PuTTY, connect using the following:

Host Name: ocelot.aul.fiu.edu
Port: 22

Click 'Open'. Once you have clicked open, you will receive a prompt for your username.
Enter your FIU username and press enter. You will then be prompted for your password. Enter your password and press enter.

Note: You may receive a PuTTY security alert saying that the server's host key is not cached in the registry. Click 'Yes' to continue.

Mac: Your Mac comes with an SSH client. Search for 'Terminal' in Spotlight.
Type the following command and press enter:

ssh ocelot.aul.fiu.edu -l [your username here]

Note: You may receive a warning saying that the authenticity of host 'ocelot.aul.fiu.edu' can't be established. Type 'yes'. You will be prompted for your password. Enter your password and press enter.

Linux: Your Linux OS comes with an SSH client. Open a terminal and type the following command and press enter:

ssh ocelot.aul.fiu.edu -l [your username here]

Note: You may receive a warning saying that the authenticity of host 'ocelot.aul.fiu.edu' can't be established. Type 'yes'. You will be prompted for your password. Enter your password and press enter.

For more information on SSH and Unix in general, please visit our Unix guide and tutorials page.


SFTP

You may use a graphical tool to remotely access your files off campus.

Windows: Students can obtain a free tool called WinSCP from http://winscp.net/eng/index.php

Once you have downloaded and installed WinSCP, run WinSCP and connect to the following host:

Host name: ocelot.aul.fiu.edu
Port number: 22
User name: [your username here]
Password: [your password here]
File protocol: SFTP
Click Login

Mac: Students can obtain a free tool called Cyberduck from http://cyberduck.ch/

Once you have downloaded and installed Cyberduck, run Cyberduck and connect to the following host:

Host name: ocelot.aul.fiu.edu
Port number: 22
User name: [your username here]
Password: [your password here]
File protocol: SFTP

Linux: GNOME users can use Nautilus. Click Places > Connect to Server and choose SSH -OR- download FileZilla

Host name: ocelot.aul.fiu.edu
Port number: 22
User name: [your username here]
Password: [your password here]

My login credentials do not work

Make sure you are using your Unix credentials and not your Windows credentials. If you have not logged in to a Unix server before, your username is your FIU username. Your FIU username is the first part of your email address before the '@fiu.edu' and in the form: jdoe001.

If you do not know your FIU username, log into MyFIU, select Main Menu > Campus Solutions Self Service > Campus Personal Information > Email Addresses. You will see your 'Campus' email address in the form: jdoe001@fiu.edu. The characters before '@fiu.edu' is your FIU username.

Your initial password is the first initial of your first name, followed by your Panther ID, and the first initial of your last name.

For example: A student named 'John Doe' with a Panther ID of '1234567' would be 'j1234567d'.

Which printer do I print to in the laboratory?

  • Students located in ECS 237 can print to 'NP237'.
  • Students located in ECS 241 can print to 'Venom'.
  • Students located in ECS 252 can print to 'Pencil'.

Note: All of these printers support duplex (both sides) printing. Students are encouraged to print duplex when ever possible.


The printer is out of toner

Please send an email to request@cis.fiu.edu and we will replace the toner as soon as possible. If it is after 5PM, it may not be replaced until the following business day. In this case, you should print to another printer in another laboratory.


The printer is out of paper

Please send an email to request@cis.fiu.edu and we will deliver more paper as soon as possible. If it is after 5PM, it may not be delivered until the following business day. In this case, you should print to another printer in another laboratory.

I found something in the laboratory. Where can I turn it in?

Any found items should be taken to the laboratory managers in ECS 258.


I lost an item in the laboratory or classroom. Where can I go to see if it has been turned in?

If you have lost any items in the laboratory, you can try visiting the lost and found in ECS 258.

Internet Access

Students should use the campus 'FIU_SECUREWiFi' wireless. Once you have connected, you will need to authenticate with your MyFIU credentials.

Faculty

It takes me a long time to login to the Windows PCs. What can I do to fix this?

The School of Computing & Information Sciences (SCIS) we use roaming profiles. Roaming profiles allow a user's desktop and application settings to follow them no matter which workstation they login to on the domain. This roaming profile is downloaded to the computer when you login and uploaded back to the server when you log off. The reason it takes you a long time to login is because you have a lot of data in your roaming profile.

Your roaming profile lives in a hidden directory in your home directory called ".ad-profile-win7". In Windows, C:\Users\ is your Roaming Profile. The most common culprits for slow logins are Dropbox and virtual machines. When installed incorrectly, these can add numerous gigabytes worth of data to your roaming profile which translates to a substantial login time.

The contents of this folder should not be modified while you are logged in to a Windows PC. You will need to SSH in to one of our Unix servers and move or delete the offending folders and or files from your roaming profile.


How do I change my Windows password?

Once your logged in, press CTRL + ALT + DELETE and select the option that says "Change a password".


How do I change my Linux password?

Once your logged in, open a terminal and type 'yppasswd'.

I already have an FIU email account. Why do I need a School of Computing & Information Sciences (SCIS) email account?

All official correspondence from the School of Computing & Information Sciences (SCIS) will be sent to your SCIS email account.


How do I check my SCIS email?

Faculy can visit http://mail.cs.fiu.edu to check their mail on a web browser, however, we recommend you setup your mail account on a mail client such as Mozilla Thunderbird.

Mail server configuration

Incoming mail server

Server Name: imap.cs.fiu.edu
Connection Security: SSL
Port: 993

Outgoing mail server

Server Name: smtp.cs.fiu.edu
Connection Security: STARTTLS
Port: 587

I do not know or have forgotten my password

Send an email to request@cis.fiu.edu and the staff can assist you with resetting your password.


Setting up Procmail on your FIU-SCIS Account

Introduction

Procmail is a tool that is designed to filter your mail. In other words, it permits you to send your Email to different locations depending on its content. This is very handy because you can use it to do things like:

  • Split mail from different places into different folders
  • Delete mail from undesireable sources
  • Forward certain email to a script to process it further
  • Forward certain email to another address so you can read it elsewhere
  • and much more
Setting up Procmail

In the past, you used to have to use a ".forward" file to use procmail. You no longer have to do this, since *ALL* email is delivered using procmail. The only file you have to worry about is your .procmailrc file, which is located in your UNIX home directory. The first step is to create a mail directory inside your home directory, if you don't already have one. Just type, in UNIX:

cd ~
mkdir mail
chmod 700 mail

The chmod command keeps other people from poking around in your mail directory, but allows you to access it. The second step is to actually create the file. For instance, in UNIX, type:

pico .procmailrc

(or emacs, or vi, or whatever editor you want; pico is easiest for beginners, though) Then, paste in the following. This is the procmail header, which defines various operating parameters.

# .procmailrc begins here
PATH=$HOME/bin:/usr/bin:/usr/ucb:/bin:/usr/local/bin:.
MAILDIR=$HOME/mail # Make sure it exists
DEFAULT=/var/mail/$LOGNAME
VERBOSE=off
LOCKFILE=/var/mail/.proclock.$LOGNAME
LOGFILE=$MAILDIR/.procmail.log
# Recipes go here
#
# .procmailrc ends here

Procmail automatically replaces "$LOGNAME" with your username and "$HOME" with your home directory. The LOCKFILE is used by procmail to keep two different procmail processes from accessing your mailbox at the same time, causing corruption. The LOGFILE contains a log of procmail transactions; this is handy if something is not working and you want to find out why. DEFAULT specifies the destination of all Email that does not match any recipies. Since there are no recipes yet, all your incoming email will go to DEFAULT, which is your mail spool.

Creating Recipes

A recipe is a rule that tells procmail what to do with a particular Email. Recipes must be placed after the header in your .procmailrc file, IE, after the "Recipes go here" comment in the above example. Here are some examples of useful recipes. Let's say we have a jerk with the Email address "jerk@microsoft.com" who is sending you lots of annoying Email, and you want to stop seeing the messages. This recipe will do that:

# Begin procmail recipe
:1
^From.*jerk\@microsoft\.com.*
/dev/null
# End procmail recipe

Explanation:

[First Line] :1
There is always a : on the first line of every recipe. The number (in this case 1) after the : specifies how many rules follow for this recipe. All the rules must match for the recipe to take the message.

[Second Line] ^From.*jerk\@microsoft\.com.*
This line will match any Email that contains the above text. Since the From header is integral to most Emails, and contains the sender's Email address, that line will match messages from "jerk@microsoft.com". The line is a regular expression, so standard UNIX regular expression syntax applies.

[Third Line] /dev/null
The last line in a recipe tells procmail what file to send the message to. It is called the "action line". In this case, we're sending the message to /dev/null, which is the "bit bucket", all data sent there is deleted. Remember that jerk@microsoft.com could always change his email address, or find another ISP. This won't necessarily stop someone from harassing you. It is best to not brag about the filter; if the person doesn't know his email is being deleted, he will likely continue sending the messages and wonder why you aren't replying!

Example: Carbon Copies

Let's say you want to do something with a message, like file it away, but still want the message to continue being processed by the remaining recipes. To do this, add a "c" after the number in the : line. For instance:

# Begin procmail recipe
:1 c
^From.*pelina\@cs\.fiu\.edu.*
/homes/$LOGNAME/mail/pelina
# End procmail recipe

The above recipe will save a CARBON COPY of all messages from pelina@cis.fiu.edu to the "pelina" mail spool file, and the message will still be delivered to your INBOX, provided there are no more recipes after this one that match that message and do something else with it.

Example: Forwarding

You can also use procmail to forward your mail. Say you get a lot of personal email at your school address from friend@yahoo.com, and you don't want it distracting you at work. You can quietly forward that to your personal email (say it's guru@foo.org) with a rule like this:

# Begin procmail recipe
:1
^From.*friend\@yahoo\.com.*
! guru@foo.org
# End procmail recipe

The "!" in the action line tells procmail to send the message to that address.

Example: Filing certain messages into folders

Here is another example of a procmail recipe; this one will take all messages from pelina@cis.fiu.edu and place them in the mail folder "pelina".

# Begin procmail recipe
:1
^From.*pelina\@cs\.fiu\.edu.*
/homes/$LOGNAME/mail/pelina
# End procmail recipe

Since $LOGNAME is replaced by your username, messages from pelina@cis.fiu.edu will be stored in the mail spool file "/homes/username/mail/pelina", which you can access from pine and/or imap.


Going on Vacation? Here is how to setup your vacation mailer.

If you will be away from the office for a while, you can set up vacation mode. This means that anyone who emails you will receive a message telling them that you are on vacation and will read your mail when you get back.

Setting up vacation mode requires minor UNIX usage; if you are not familiar with UNIX, we would be happy to set this up for you; simply E-mail us at request@cs.fiu.edu. There are two ways to set up vacation mode. The simplest way is to just use the "vacation" command. However, if you have a complex .procmailrc file (and you will know if you do), you may want to use the .procmailrc method.

vacation command

SSH into leopard.cs.fiu.edu and run command:

vacation

You will be presented with a text editor containing a default vacation message. Edit it to your tastes, then save the message. That's it! Vacation mode is now set up. Feel free to test it by sending an E-mail to yourself; you should get an immediate response with your vacation message.

When you return, to turn off vacation mode, simply ssh into UNIX and type:

rm -f ~/.forward

This will remove the vacation script from your .forward file and return you to normal mail processing.

The .procmailrc method

If you have a .procmailrc file to sort your E-mail, you will want to use this method. It will work the same way for folks that E-mail you, but your mail sorting will be preserved.To set this up, simply add this section before the first rule in your .procmailrc file:

#
# vacation handler
#
:0 Whc:.vacation.lock
*!^FROM_DAEMON
*!^X-loopity-loop: yourusername@cs.fiu.edu
*^TOyourusername.*
| formail -rD 8192 $HOME/.vacation.cache
:0 ehc
| ( formail -rA"Precedence: Junk" \
-A"X-loopity-loop: yourusername@cs.fiu.edu";\
cat $HOME/vacation-message.txt ) | /usr/lib/sendmail -oi -t

Replace all instances of 'yourusername' with your actual SCS username. Then, edit the file vacation-message.txt in your home directory, and place your vacation message in it. That's all there is to it! Vacation mode is now set up. When you return from vacation, simply edit your .procmailrc file and remove or comment out the above section, and delete the file ~/.vacation.cache and you will return to normal mail processing.

SSH


Windows: Windows users need to download an SSH client first. Students can obtain a free SSH client called PuTTY from http://www.chiark.greenend.org.uk/~sgtatham/putty Once you have downloaded and installed PuTTY, connect using the following:

Host Name: wolf.cis.fiu.edu
Port: 22

Click 'Open'. Once you have clicked open, you will receive a prompt for your username. Enter your FIU username and press enter. You will then be prompted for your password. Enter your password and press enter.
Note: You may receive a PuTTY security alert saying that the server's host key is not cached in the registry. Click 'Yes' to continue.

Mac: Your Mac comes with an SSH client.
Search for 'Terminal' in Spotlight. Once you have opened a terminal, type the following command and press enter: ssh wolf.cis.fiu.edu -l [your username here]
Note: You may receive a warning saying that the authenticity of host 'ocelot.aul.fiu.edu' can't be established. Type 'yes'. You will be prompted for your password. Enter your password and press enter.

Linux: Your Linux OS comes with an SSH client.
Open a terminal and type the following command and press enter: ssh ocelot.aul.fiu.edu -l [your username here]
Note: You may receive a warning saying that the authenticity of host 'wolf.cis.fiu.edu' can't be established. Type 'yes'. You will be prompted for your password. Enter your password and press enter.


SFTP

You may use a graphical tool to remotely access your files off campus.

Windows: Faculty can obtain a free tool called WinSCP from http://winscp.net/eng/index.php

Once you have downloaded and installed WinSCP, run WinSCP and connect to the following host:

Host name: wolf.cis.fiu.edu
Port number: 22
User name: [your username here]
Password: [your password here]
File protocol: SFTP
Click Login

Mac: Faculty can obtain a free tool called Cyberduck from http://cyberduck.ch/

Once you have downloaded and installed Cyberduck, run Cyberduck and connect to the following host:

Host name: wolf.cis.fiu.edu
Port number: 22
User name: [your username here]
Password: [your password here]
File protocol: SFTP

Linux: GNOME users can use Nautilus. Click Places > Connect to Server and choose SSH -OR- download FileZilla

Host name: wolf.cis.fiu.edu
Port number: 22
User name: [your username here]
Password: [your password here]

My login credentials do not work

Make sure you are using your Unix credentials and not your Windows credentials. If you have not logged in to a Unix server before, your username is your FIU username. Your FIU username is the first part of your email address before the '@fiu.edu' and in the form: jdoe001.

If you do not know your FIU username, log into MyFIU, select Main Menu > Campus Solutions Self Service > Campus Personal Information > Email Addresses. You will see your 'Campus' email address in the form: jdoe001@fiu.edu. The characters before '@fiu.edu' is your FIU username.

Your initial password is the first initial of your first name, followed by your Panther ID, and the first initial of your last name.

For example: A faculty member named 'John Doe' with a Panther ID of '1234567' would be 'j1234567d'.

VPN Accounts

VPN accounts are offered for faculty members to connect to the SCIS department network and work remotely. In some special cases, graduate students who show a need for a VPN account may be granted one with prior approval by their sponsoring faculty. If you would like to request a VPN account, send a request to request@cis.fiu.edu


Please choose your operating system:


If you feel that these instructions did not help enough, please email request@cis.fiu.edu.

Which printer can I print to?

If you do not have a printer in your office, you may use the following printers:

  • 'Press' is a large volume black and white printer located in the printer room in ECS 376B.
  • 'Stapler' is an all-in-one black and white printer located in the main office in ECS 354.
  • 'Clipboard' is a color printer located in the main office in ECS 354.

Note: All of these printers support duplex (both sides) printing. Faculty are encouraged to print duplex when ever possible and only use Clipboard when their job requires a color printer.


The printer is out of toner

Please send an email to request@cis.fiu.edu and we will replace the toner as soon as possible. If it is after 5PM, it may not be replaced until the following business day. In this case, you should print to another printer in the office.


The printer is out of paper

Please send an email to request@cis.fiu.edu and we will deliver more paper as soon as possible. If it is after 5PM, it may not be delivered until the following business day. In this case, you should print to another printer in the office.


I would like to print to another printer. How can I add that printer?

These procedures will guide you in adding one of our department network printers. If you have a local printer, you will need to install the specific printer drivers and software for your local printer

Windows: Open run and type \\papermill.cs.fiu.edu\[printer name] or simply connect to our print server by typing \\papermill.cs.fiu.edu and double click the printer(s) that you would like to add.

Linux: Instructions will vary depending on your distro of Linux. The following steps are specific to Fedora but should be similar for other distros. Go to Administration and Print Settings. Choose add a printer. Choose network printer.

Enter:

ipp://papermill.cs.fiu.edu/printers/[printer name]

If you would like to add all of our department network printers, create a file called "client.conf" in "/etc/cups". In that file, enter "ServerName papermill.cs.fiu.edu". You may need to restart your machine for the changes to take effect.

Mac: Go to System Preferences. Select "Print & Scan". Click the plus (+) symbol and choose "Add Printer or Scanner...". Select "IP" at the top. In address, enter "papermill.cs.fiu.edu". Make sure "Internet Printing Protocol - IPP" is selected for Protocol. In Queue, enter "printers/[printer name]". For Name, enter the name of the printer again. Make sure "Generic PostScript Printer" is chosen for Use. Choose "Add".

Note: You may receive a message that says "Unable to verify the printer on your network". Click "Continue". Check the box that says "Duplex Printing Unit" as all of our network printers support duplex printing.


I would like to print from my own laptop. How can I do so?

You will need to be connected to our network to print from your laptop. You can do this by connecting to the 'fiu-scs' department wireless network or by connecting to our VPN server. Once you have connected to our network, you can add our network printers to your laptop and print jobs to them. For information on adding network printers, please see adding a printer above.

I found something in the laboratory. Where can I turn it in?

Any found items should be taken to the laboratory managers in ECS 258.


I lost an item in the laboratory or classroom. Where can I go to see if it has been turned in?

If you have lost any items in the laboratory, you can try visiting the lost and found in ECS 258.

Network access for laptops

Faculty can use either:

  • 'FIU_SECUREWiFi' is the campus wireless. It is available throughout the campus and in the Engineering Campus.Once you have connected, you will need to authenticate with your MyFIU credentials.
  • 'fiu-scs' is the department wireless here in the School of Computing & Information Sciences (SCIS). It is only available within the ECS building. There is no password to connect to the wireless but you will need to authenticate with your SCIS credentials in a web browser.

Openfire

The School of Computing & Information Sciences (SCIS) maintains an Openfire chat server for our students, faculty, and administrators. Openfire uses the only widely adopted open protocol for instant messaging, XMPP (also called Jabber).To use this service, we encourage users to use Pidgin, a free chat client installed on our department computers. Open Pidgin and choose 'Add Account'. Under 'Login Options' choose the following:

Protocol: XMPP
Screen name: [Your SCIS Username]
Domain: chat.cis.fiu.edu
Password: [Your SCIS Windows Password]

Once you are done, click 'Save'. If you would like more information about using Pidgin, visit https://developer.pidgin.im/wiki/Using%20Pidgin.
If you have any questions or comments about our chat service, please contact jabber@cis.fiu.edu.

Need to Recover a File?

Did you accidentally delete a file from your home directory (U: drive)? Do you need to restore a file from an earlier point in time? We strongly urge our students and faculty to store your data in your home directory (U: drive). This network drive is backed up regularly and snapshots of your home directory are taken daily every morning.

If you need to restore a file, follow the steps below:

  1. SSH to the server where your home directory lives. Generally, faculty, staff, and graduate students are on bear.cs.fiu.edu. Undergraduate students are on buffalo.cs.fiu.edu.
    NOTE: If you do not know where your home directory lives, you can use this script to tell you: http://www.cis.fiu.edu/support/userinfo.php
  2. Once you are logged in, type the following command: cd ../../.zfs/snapshot/n-backup-YYYYMMDD/users/[username] Where YYYYMMDD is the date you would like to go back to and [username] is your username.

There you will find your home directory as it was at the time of the snapshot that day. If you would like to restore a file or folder, simply type:

# cp [filename] ~

# cp -r [folder] ~

That will copy a file from the snapshot location to your home directory. If you are copying a folder, you must use the '-r' option.

New to Unix?

Check out this excellent tutorial on getting started with Unix:

Webspace

The School of Computing & Information Sciences (SCIS) provides our students with a webspace available to host your own website. Create a directory called "public_html" in your U: drive or UNIX home directory and place the website files in there.

Your website is accessible as: http://www.aul.fiu.edu/~[your-username-here]

On Ocelot:

# chmod 711 ~

This sets your home directory world searchable

# chmod 755 ~/public_html

This sets your public_html directory world readable