Ning Xie Portrait

Ning Xie

Assistant Professor

Biography

Ning Xie received his Ph.D. in Computer Science in 2012 from MIT. His research interests are in many aspects of algorithmic and complexity theory, including property testing, local computation algorithms, Fourier analysis of Boolean functions, circuit complexity and coding theory. His research has been supported by NSF and U.S. Air Force Research Lab Summer Faculty Fellowship Program.


Research and Educational Interests

Background Education

2012 Postdoctoral Fellow, Computer Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
2012 PH.D., Computer Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
2002 M.S., Computer Science, SUNY at Buffalo
1993 M.S., Theoretical Physics, Fudan University, China
1993 B.E., Shipbuilding Engineering, Harbin Engineering University, China

Professional Activities

Professional Experience

2013 – present Assistant Professor, Computer Science, Florida International University
2012 – 2012 Postdoctoral Fellow, Computer Science, MIT
2007 – 2012 Research Assistant, Computer Science, MIT
2000 – 2005 Teaching Assistant, Computer Science, SUNY at Buffalo

Selected Publications

  1. N. Alon, R. Rubinfeld, S. Vardi, and N. Xie. Space-efficient local computation algorithms. In Proc. 23rd ACM-SIAM Symposium on Discrete Algorithms, pages 1132–1139, 2012.
  2. Y. Mansour, A. Rubinstein, S. Vardi, and N. Xie. Converting online algorithms to local computation algorithms. In Proc. 39th Annual International Conference on Automata, Languages, and Programming, pages 653–664, 2012.
  3. R. Rubinfeld, G. Tamir, S. Vardi, and N. Xie. Fast local computation algorithms. In Proc. 2nd Symposium on Innovations in Computer Science, pages 223–238, 2011.
  4. A. Bhattacharyya and N. Xie. Lower bounds on testing triangle-freeness in Boolean functions. In Proc. 21st ACM-SIAM Symposium on Discrete Algorithms, pages 87–98, 2010.
  5. N. Alon, A. Andoni, T. Kaufman, K. Matulef, R. Rubinfeld, and N. Xie. Testing k-wise and almost k-wise independence. In Proc. 39th Annual ACM Symposium on the Theory of Computing, pages 496–505, 2007.