New Eye Implant Device could Save Glaucoma Patients’ vision

Eye Implant Device could Save Glaucoma Patients

People with high-risk glaucoma will be able to monitor their disease, anywhere, anytime, thanks to a new device developed by an FIU professor. S.S. Iyengar

S. S. Iyengar PortraitGlaucoma is an eye disease in which increased intraocular pressure causes damage to the optic nerve and leads to blindness if left untreated. Diabetics and people above age 50 who suffer from hypertension are at high-risk for developing the disease. According to Iyengar’s research, it’s estimated that by 2020, 11 million individuals will be blind as a result of glaucoma. Currently, more than 2.2 million Americans have the disease, but only half of them know it. Glaucoma accounts for nine to 12 percent of all cases of blindness in the United States.

S.S. Iyengar (Ram Iyengar), help develop a device, which is the size of a small electronic chip, is surgically implanted in the eye between the iris and the cornea. Patients can keep track of their intraocular pressure, as often as once a week or more if necessary, by simply looking in the mirror. Iyengar hopes to change that with his device, which is inexpensive and easy to manufacture. “I wanted something low-cost so everyone can afford it,” he said. “It’s a great device for developing countries. It can cost patients as little as $15-20 once mass produced.”

Source: New device could save glaucoma patients’ eyesight